To Believe Or Not To Believe She's been voted among the top 100 living geniuses of the world for her work on depression, but Australian psychologist Dorothy Rowe has also had an abiding interest in religion. Not a believer herself, she subjects religion to a scathing critique in her book What Should I Believe, but also admits we can't live without belief. Rachael Kohn: It's the Christmas season: The Salvos are stationed at their collection boxes and the shops are decked out with tinsel. There are even nativity crèches in some stores that dare to be different. But what do people believe, and why? Hello, I'm Rachael Kohn and on The Spirit of Things on ABC Radio National, we plumb…
Program: Life Matterswith Geraldine Doogue14 February 2001 Enemies: Why They're the Next Best Thing to Friends Summary:Writer and psychologist Dorothy Rowe explains why the relationships we have with our enemies can be as rewarding as the ones we have with our friends. Publications:Friends and Enemies: The Need to Love and Hate Author: Dorothy Rowe Price: $53.50 Publisher: Harper Collins Australian Broadcasting Commission Click here to visit the ABC Radio National web sitethen use the on-site search device to find references to Dorothy Rowe

'Encounter Moments' discussion

Wednesday, 06 April 2011 04:31
Program: EncounterSunday 27 April 2003 Moments Summary: Encounter this week is a series of luminous moments from a symposium in Brisbane called "Spirituality and Psycho-Therapy." Details or Transcript:Through the lectures and discussions a group of men and women wrestle with the fleeting and the absolute of religion, spirituality, psycho-therapy and pastoral care. In the worlds of Christianity, Taoism, atheism and the various therapies for mental health moments of reality appear for each participant. MUSIC – Ross Edwards Click this link to visit the ABC Radio National web site for a complete transcript of the discussion -http://www.abc.net.au/rn/relig/enc/stories/s837662.htm Australian Broadcasting Commission Click here to visit the ABC Radio National web sitethen use the on-site search device to find references to Dorothy Rowe

'Breakfast' about 'Depression'

Wednesday, 06 April 2011 04:31
Program: BreakfastWednesday 28 January 2004 DepressionWinston Churchill called his frequent bouts of depression his 'Black Dog'. He wasn't alone, of course. We now know that depression affects millions of people. In fact, the World Health Organization predicts that by 2020 it will be the second-leading cause of disability in the world after heart disease. Dr Dorothy Rowe, who's just been named as one of the fifty wisest people in the United Kingdom, sees depression a bit differently. A psychologist and author of Depression: The Way Out of Your Prison. She believes that antidepressant drugs have not lived up to their promise and that a cure for depression lies in learning to live wisely. We speak to Dr Rowe who is…
Program: Life Matterswith Julie McCrossin2 Feb 2004 Feature Interview with Dorothy Rowe: Dorothy Rowe’s Self Dorothy Rowe is a psychologist, social analyst, writer and commentator, who has appeared on Life Matters a number of times. She was recently named one of the 50 wisest people in the UK. Rowe’s work ranges wide, from responses to popular culture; to the question of visibility/ invisibility (esp for certain types of women); psychiatry and psychology; parenting; friendships (and the role of enemies); the meaning of money etc. Broadly, though, her work looks at perceptions of the self – and how this perception is then played out, and responded to institutionally (by medicine, society, psychiatry etc). Dorothy Rowe joined us to discuss her life,…
Program: The Wisdom Interviewswith Peter ThompsonSunday 25 July 2004Summer re-broadcastMonday 3 January 2005 Feature Interview with Dorothy Rowe: Summary: Psychologist and author Dorothy Rowe is known throughout the world as a leader in the study and treatment of depression. Her opinions about the proper place of drugs in the treatment of the illness have made her controversial in the medical field, but she was recently voted one of the 50 wisest people in the UK, by Saga Magazine. Click this link to visit the ABC Radio National web site for a complete transcript of the interview -an audio version is also available at the same addresshttp://www.abc.net.au/rn/bigidea/stories/s1149431.htm Australian Broadcasting Commission Click here to visit the ABC Radio National web sitethen use…

All in the Mind

Wednesday, 06 April 2011 04:21
11 February 2006 on ABC Radio National http://www.abc.net.au/rn/allinthemind/stories/2006/1564299.htm 7/04/2007  All In The Mind The prison of depression - a conversation with Dorothy Rowe  Dorothy Rowe has always seen herself as an outsider, yet this psychologist and prolific author is considered one of the 50 wisest people in the UK and her many books continue to sell like hot cakes. Depression, she says, is an intolerable prison we build for ourselves, but we can escape by choosing to change the way we interpret our lives. Hear her controversial yet heartfelt views on the 'prison of depression' in this frank conversation with Lynne Malcolm.  Transcript  Lynne Malcolm: Hi there, Lynne Malcolm here with All in the Mind on ABC Radio National. Today an unorthodox yet rather…
Dorothy Rowe named in list of the 100 most powerful women in Britain: Business, Academia and Politics From the towering figures of business and politics to academia and science, we reveal the women who wield the most influence – visibly or invisibly – over our lives today The Queen, 84 The Queen for 57 years deserves her own category in our power list. She has survived decades of social, political and personal upheaval, and, at a time when the Royal Family was at its most unpopular, she showed that by letting us glimpse her vulnerable side – appealing to the public 'as a grandmother’ after the death of Diana – she could transform the public’s perception and save the monarchy.…
Why We Lie, by Dorothy Rowe, Fourth Estate RRP£18.99, 384 pages Review by Hilary Spurling, Published: June 12 2010 Lies, in Dorothy Rowe’s book, form the basic coinage of human exchange. She investigates the catastrophic lies elevated to mythological status by the Nazis, and by Joseph Stalin with his army of assiduous western apologists headed by Jean-Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir. But Rowe is most disturbing when she concentrates on the everyday fibs we all tell, the little white lies defined by Louis Aragon – another French master of the arts of deceit and betrayal – as “the words we put on like gloves, to hide torn hands, for fear of gossip”. Torn hands, and the cover-ups devised to conceal…
New truths about why we lieby Melanie McDonagh, published in the London Evening Standard 19th May 2010 As the new Government discovers its predeccessors were less than honest about the country's finances, new research shows that children as young as two know how to lie. So psychologist Dorothy Rowe couldn't have chosen a more apt time to write a book, Why We Lie, examining why even the most truthful among us tell fibs. Lying is a subject in which we all have a stake, which is why Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Augustine, Aquinas, Bacon and more moral philosophers than you would care to mention have given serious thought to it, not to mention Oscar Wilde.  So what does Dorothy Rowe have…
Roomies? Oh, Brother: Why Some Siblings Are Opting to Live Together WE STOOD AT the Home Depot paint-mixing counter in an exasperated stalemate, paper samples of "Village Square" and "Toffee Crunch" shades clenched in our fists. Then she said it. "I ... hate ... you." Her voice was flat and even, as frustration culminated in those three words. Then, to the horror of the salesman helping us, Tracey burst into tears. Uh-oh. Maybe living with my sister wasn't such an inspired idea. It was May 2008 and we were two weeks away from moving into the two-bedroom condo we'd bought together in Clarendon. How was I going to survive living with my younger sibling of three and a half years…
Linda Hurcombe reads a study applicable to believers and atheists What Should I Believe? Why our beliefs about the nature of death and the purpose of life dominate our livesDorothy RoweRoutledge £9.99(978-0-415-46679-0)Church Times Bookshop £9 DOROTHY ROWE intends her latest book to act as a sequel to Richard Dawkins’s The God Delusion. Dawkins asked why intelligent people believed such “garbage” as religion. What Should I Believe? gives a non-judgmental answer, with fewer utterances about the trashiness or otherwise of the religious outlook. Her explanation is applicable to any form of belief, Dawkins’s included. On account of this, Rowe has been mistaken for a Dawkins acolyte, whereas she is in fact equally critical of Dawkins and his sort. All of us, people of faith…

Review of Wanting Everything. (Apr 09)

Saturday, 02 April 2011 06:04
Caroline Dexter (posted on Amazon) I found this a totally liberating book. Rowe begins by showing how our unhappiness is born of the frustration of not getting everything we want, a process which starts as we move on from the newborn state in which all our needs are instantly met. This lack continues to disappoint us throughout life as we continue to make unreasonable demands of life. We then blame life for not giving us what we want, and we become more and more frustrated and bitter. We give the power to an external source - society or the Church, God, parents, or just some abstract power which is beyond us and which we do not even consider we can…
May your god go with you. Understanding why people are religious isn't hard, and it has little to do with the existence of God guardian.co.uk, October 24 2008 David Shariatmadari At the launch of her new book, psychologist Dorothy Rowe said she intended it to act as a sequel to The God Delusion. Dawkins, she said, had posed the question: "Why do intelligent people believe this garbage? " In What Should I Believe?, Rowe gives an answer, though with less of a blanket judgment as to the rubbishness or otherwise of the religious outlook. In fact, her explanation could be used to understand any form of belief, Dawkins' included. She starts from the premise that our greatest fear is annihilation,…
London Metropolitan University, in association with Routledge Publishers, hosted the book launch to celebrate the publication of What Should I Believe? Why our Beliefs about the Nature of Death and the Purpose of Life Dominate our Lives by Dorothy Rowe, Honorary Professor, London Metropolitan University.    Catherine Griffith (Computer Scientist), DR and Tim Lott (Author) DR and Hilary Spurling (Biographer) DR and Rob Inglis, Actor and Composer Jane Priestman, OBE and William, Lord Howie of Troon Tim Lott, Adrian Weston of Raft PR and Clare Alexander, DR's agent DR and her editor, Joanne Forshaw DR and Katharine Grummett from Routledge Publishers. DR and her PA, Louise Burgess. Photos taken by Angela Inglis.
Ilkley Gazette: Published Thursday 23rd October 2008By Annette McIntyre She has been listed as one of the six wisest people in the UK and as one of the “greatest living geniuses” of our time. With a renown that stretches across the world, she has been described as the psychologist who has changed how we understand depression and happiness It’s enough to turn anyone’s head really, but clinical psychologist Dorothy Rowe comes across as pleasant, polite and incredibly well-balanced. The author Sue Townsend has described Rowe as “the calm voice of reason in an increasingly mad world” – and after chatting with the psychologist and writer, it is easy to see why. The Australian, who has lived in England for the past…

Genius: Australian Press Release (Nov 07)

Saturday, 02 April 2011 06:03
The psychologist who has changed how we understand depression and happiness Dorothy Rowe, world-renowned Australian psychologist and writer, has recently been listed as one of the greatest living thinkers of our time.  The list of top 100 living geniuses was compiled by a panel of six experts in creativity and innovation from Creators Synectics, a global consultants firm. The company emailed 4,000 Britons this summer and asked them to nominate up to 10 living people who they considered geniuses. Each genius was then awarded scores out of ten against criteria which included: paradigm shifting; popular acclaim; intellectual power; achievement and cultural importance. Dorothy Rowe is renowned for her work on depression. She has shown how depression is not an illness…
PSYCHOLOGIST IS AUSTRALIA’S GREATEST LIVING GENIUS Australian psychologist, Dr Dorothy Rowe, has been elected as one of the world’s 100 Living Geniuses and the Newcastle-born depression expert is the highest placed Australian on the list. Creators Synectics, a global consultants firm, chose their geniuses by awarding scores out of 10 to each entrant against a number of factors: paradigm shifting; popular acclaim; intellectual power; achievement and cultural importance. Dr Rowe is placed in 72nd position in a list headed by Tim Berners-Lee, the inventor of the World Wide Web. Dr Rowe owes her status as a living genius to her radical work on depression, which she started studying long before it was recognized as a global health issue. Her ground-breaking…
Dorothy Rowe Named AsOne of the Six Wisest People in the UK In January 2004 Saga Magazine published The Wise List, the people in the UK who the magazine stated ‘had that laudable quality of wisdom. With this list, we aimed both to recognise and celebrate wisdom in a world which more often tends to celebrate beauty or wealth.’ Dorothy Rowe was listed as one of the fifty wisest people in the UK. Saga Magazine then asked readers for their nominations for the “wisest of them all” from the list of 50. In April 2004 Emma Soames, the editor of the magazine, wrote that ‘the response has been magnificent. I won’t call them winners, as the Wise List is not…
Review from: Clinical Psychology, issue 37, p.37, 2004. Depression: the way out of your prison (third edition)Dorothy RoweTJ International, 2003There is an instant freshness about this book, which is remarkable considering that it was first written in 1983. Dorothy Rowe has an ability to capture the feelings of depression and describe them both with her own writing and with the many quotations from patients that illustrate her ideas. This makes the book useful both for us as clinicians and for any members of the human race trying to understand the complexities of depression. The main theme of the book is laid out in chapter 3 ('How to build your prison’) when Dorothy first quotes the Greek philosopher Epictetus. He said,…
What others say... "Dr Dorothy Rowe, seer, has qualities which to my mind place her somewhere between sainthood and genius" Fay Weldon "Her appeal rests on a combination of clarity and vision, sanity, compassion, a deep-seated rationalisation and an eye, like Jane Austen's, for social satire. Her work .... forces you to think for your self, challenge received ideas and take responsibility for your own life." Linda Grant "Dorothy Rowe is essentially a chronicler of emotional pain, a suggester of solutions. Her perspective on existence acknowledges sadness, pain, anger but instantly makes things seem meaningful." Melissa Benn, The Guardian "Dorothy Rowe's books are exceptional. Rowe has not just got common sense but wisdom and real writing gifts. It's pleasurable to…
Understanding Depression & Finding Freedom The Talking Book version Written and read by Dorothy Rowe HarperCollins AudioBooks ISBN 0-00-104669-1 2 tapes : 3 hours of listening Dorothy Rowe, the internationally renowned psychologist and expert on depression, brings together on this tape what her thirty years of research have shown her about depression, and shows us how every one of us can take charge of our life and find the way to happiness, hope and freedom. Depression: the imprisoning experience of isolation and fear which comes when we discover that there is a serious discrepancy between what we thought our life was and what it actually is. From birth onwards we create our own secure worlds of meaning. Challenged seriously enough,…

Saturday Guardian: Susanna Rustin (Jun 10)

Saturday, 02 April 2011 05:40
“People don’t suddenly become psychotic or depressed out of the blue, there’s always a disaster that they suffer”  'If you make happiness your goal, then you're not going to get to it," says psychologist Dorothy Rowe. "Philosophers have been saying it for thousands of years. The goal should be an interesting life." Rowe has devoted her life to trying to help people free themselves from what she famously termed the "prison" of depression, to live that interesting life. In more than a dozen books, the self-help pioneer has set out what she believes are the obstacles that hold people back, and offered a recipe for, if not happiness, then a greater degree of satisfaction with their lot. Drawing on her…

The Canberra Times: Margaret Rice (Feb 09)

Saturday, 02 April 2011 05:39
Breaking down the barriers by Margaret Rice, 12/02/2009 Organising to interview psychologist Dorothy Rowe, the woman the BBC notes has been described as one of the six wisest people in Britain and one of the world's 100 living geniuses, it is easy to be intimidated. How accessible will she be? Will she be so remote that an interview with a mere mortal will be beyond her? Rowe earned these labels because she is the author of 13 best-selling books at the classier end of the self-help spectrum, or at the most sombre, depending on your point of view. She has long written on the simple and yet at the same time challenging steps that we can each take as individuals…

Therapy Today (Feb 09)

Saturday, 02 April 2011 05:39
Questionnaire published in Therapy Today, February 2009, Vol 20, Iss 1 World-renowned for her work on depression, Dorothy Rowe believes perfect happiness would be very boring What made you decide to become a clinical psychologist? When I left university, where I’d majored in psychology, I taught English, history and maths in high school and didn’t enjoy it. When I was invited to train as an educational psychologist I seized the chance to escape. What gives your life purpose? The purpose of my life is to live. What is your earliest memory? I was lying on my mother’s lap as she dried me, presumably after a bath. What are you passionate about? The stupidity of people who insist on creating and…
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